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  • Sheila Gomes

Sheila Gomes: A Mechanistic Universe?

Interview & Feature


Frequencies #499 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 70 cm



Frequencies #492 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 60 cm



Frequencies #493 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

40 x 50 cm



Emerging #537 (2021)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 70 cm



Synapses #516 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 60 cm



Synapses #506 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 70 cm



Synapses #514 (2020)

Acrylic on canvas

50 x 60 cm



Interview


There is a distinctly neurological theme in your work. In what ways is your art influenced by the progression of modern science?


Amongst other topics that inspire me, I am very curious about human nature and its mechanisms, especially the brain, which is still a vast field to be explored by scientists - why not by artists, too? It's intriguing and beautiful at the same time. In a way, I find that this subject is very similar to art. Like art, science has its own plasticity and is an infinite resource for inspiration. Scientific progress means, among other things, that we are discovering more about our nature and the nature around us. We are constantly learning new things and undergoing change. This organic progress that happens both inside and outside of us is something that really interests me, so I like to look at it closely and translate it artistically.


Your work appears to transcend and question the temporal world. Could you tell us more about the philosophy behind your pieces?


I believe art has an inherent power capable of transcending time and connecting with us, regardless of the period in which it was created. Art always seeks out a voice; it wants to speak to us. When it resonates with us, it brings out an ancestral feeling. I think this is beautiful and worthy of deep exploration, so I keep looking for that particular quality in artwork, both as a viewer and as an artist.


There is a geometric quality to many of your paintings. How does shape come into your art, aesthetically and conceptually?


I think that the shapes come naturally, responding to each other in the composition. It's like they're looking for balance, trying to contrast with one another. The main concept may be harmony. I don't really think about it a lot when I'm creating a piece. I have an idea about what I want to explore; from there, the shapes are like my compositional tools, each with their own tone and sound. Some speak louder than others, some are more delicate than others. Each adds its own value to the work.


What led you to adopt acrylic paint as your main medium?


I like the flexibility and versatility of acrylics. They dry quickly, which is perfect for me as I work in layers. With acrylics, I don't have to wait days for each layer to dry before I can start another.


Do you remember the very first thing you ever painted? How have your style and choice of subject changed over time?


I don't remember what I painted first, but my earliest memory is from the first time I painted on cloth - I think it was a t-shirt. I remember hating it. I was very young and I found it difficult to paint on that type of surface. I think that memory stayed with me, because it took me a long time to try to paint on canvas again or to paint in general. In terms of changes in style, I think that is ongoing. It's like a work-in-progress that's changing a little bit with each new piece. I don't know if I have a specific subject, or if it has really changed significantly over time. I just try to explore the works like a language - one I feel comfortable using.


Have you got any upcoming projects or exhibitions?


I've been working on a new series for some time now. I think I'll be presenting it soon. This November I'm participating in a group show with some works from the Wireless series. It's a project by Fresh Salad which will feature both a physical exhibition at RuptureXibit Gallery in London and an online exhibition space. I'm very excited to be part of it. There are a few more collaborations to come before the end of this year.



About Sheila Gomes:


Born in 1987 in São Paulo, Brazil, with a degree in Digital Design, Shee (Sheila Gomes) began her work in visual arts the same year she graduated from college in 2009. Shee has been showcasing her work in a variety of exhibitions, collaborations and projects, with curated works featuring in international books and magazines.

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